A – Z Challenge 2016, A is for…

Ais for  Amigoni, Jacopo (1682–1752), also known as Giacomo Amiconi,  he was born in Naples or Venice in the late-Baroque or Rococo period. He is thought to have begun his career in Venice, but is known to have been well travelled and was prolific throughout Europe, where his portraits were in demand. Jacopo_amigoni,_il_cantante_farinelli_con_amici_(detail)

Amigoni initially painted both mythological and religious scenes before becoming sought after to decorate the homes of the wealthy. In 1717, he is documented as working in Bavaria in the Castle of Nymphenburg (1719), and yes part of the reason I picted him was because I love that name lol. then in  in the castle of Schleissheim (1725–1729); and in the Benedictine abbey of Ottobeuren. He returned to Venice in 1726. His Arraignment of Paris hangs in the Villa Pisani at Stra. From 1730 to 1739 he worked in England, in Pown House, Moor Park Wolterton Hall and in the Theatre of Covent Garden. I love the fact that he painted in such diverse places from theatres to monasteries in a time where you would have though that doing one would exclude you from another.

In 1739 he returned to Italy, perhaps to Naples and surely to Montecassino, in whose Abbey existed two canvases (destroyed during World War II). Until 1747, he travelled to Venice to paint for Sigismund Streit, for the Casa Savoia and other buildings of the city. In 1747 he left Italy and established himself in Madrid. There he became court painter to Ferdinand VI of Spain and director of the Royal Academy of Saint Fernando. He died in Madrid.

Jacopo_Amigoni_-_Juno_Receiving_the_Head_of_Argos_-_WGA00272This painting is entitled Juno Receiving the Head of Argos (1730-32) and I have a couple of reasons for picking it first I love the fact it is mythical rather than religious but also having seen this type of work in real life you know that it will be a substantial piece and a photo will never do it justice.

I also love peacocks which of course are depicted here as a sign of the wealth and extravagance of the patron for whom this painting was commissioned. I love the fact there was no question of body shaming that having saggy boobs and love handles was totally okay, although I will say the cherub on the floor looking up does look a little creepy, like an old mans face on a babies body.

I could discuss more the technical aspects, there are issues with this painting in terms of multiple light sources and a couple of anatomical abnormalities but the fact is sometimes you just have to over look the details to enjoy the big picture something that in today’s society has become increasingly difficult for a lot of people as everything is placed under a microscope and scrutinised.

One thing I am going to do with each painting I feature is consider what type of book would it fit on the cover of, I think this would be a story of revenge and betrayal, the scorned woman receiving the head of her murdered lover for whom she feels nothing but contempt, in the story the messenger would be the new lover who has acted on her wishes but of course she would in turn betray him and it would be a he said/she said case for justice to determine the true criminal before they are both condemned, she going to her fate with a hard heart him heartbroken still at her abandonment of him.

(I have taken some of the facts and the images from Wikipedia for speed but the thoughts on the paintings and emotions and ideas provoked are entirely mine)

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5 comments on “A – Z Challenge 2016, A is for…

    • I watch and listen to far too much true crime, the grim fact is that it is not so far from things which you can read in any paper or see on the news on a daily basis, though I admit not always employing quite so gruesome methods

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I am not at all familiar with this artist, though he painted in a style that I like.

    Hope you’ll visit my “26 Things about me” posts inspired by your January post. I’ll be answering the questions over the period of April A to Z at:

    Wrote By Rote

    I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

    Lee

    Like

      • Cross platform commenting is difficult for many. I have been persistent to the point where I rarely find a platform that I can’t comment on. I saw your Twitter follow though and that works too. Thanks!

        Lee

        Like

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